EIEIO – What is all that alphabet soup and does it add value to your project?


In the construction industry, like many others, there are many certifications, professional designations, and credentials. So does it add value to you for your project? How do you know it shows added expertise? Should I hire someone who does not have a particular certification? Learning more about what the initials stand for will help you evaluate what matters to you. Looking for someone who has gone through the added training that will benefit your project is a key to selecting the right team.

So let me define some of the more common letters you see after the names of prominent architects:

RA (often not used if a member of AIA) – Registered Architect – this means you are legally empowered to practice architecture. You can start your own firm, seal, stamp, or sign your own drawings, and turn your client’s ideas into reality. For a design project this is the base level designation that shows the person has achieved a certain level of education, experience, and knowledge, without it, you have no way of knowing if the ‘designer’ has achieved any level of competence in design as measured by testing. Architects are responsible for protecting the public health, safety, and welfare, so earning the license is not an easy task. Hiring someone to design your home or business with this designation will give you peace of mind. This is the designation that holds an architect accountable for their actions.

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ertification demonstrates knowledge of the construction process, contractual relationships, and construction contract administration procedures.

AIA – indicates you are an RA and a member in good standing with the American Institute of Architects. You can be an “Assoc. AIA” without being an RA. images

CSI – indicates you are a member in good standing with the Construction Specifications Institute.

NCARB – indicates you hold a National Council of Architectural Review Board certificate which speeds the reciprocity process. Most don’t add this to their signature unless soliciting work that might require licensure in another State in the future.

CDT – The Construction Documents Technology (CDT) Program provides a comprehensive overview for anyone who writes, interprets, enforces, or manages construction documents. By being able to understand and interpret written construction documents, CDTs perform their jobs more effectively. By understanding the roles and relationships of all participants, CDTs improve communication among all members of the construction team.

CCS – A Certified Construction Specifier (CCS) is a skilled product researcher who knows how to investigate and identify cost-effective, efficient solutions, and then communicate those solutions through the specifications. CCS certification demonstrates advanced knowledge in all aspects of specifications development, including contractual relationships, organization, preparation and enforcement.

CCCA – Certified Construction Contract Administration (CCCA) certification teaches you to develop, administer and enforce construction documentation. CCCA c

LEED AP – The LEED AP credential affirms your advanced knowledge in green building as well as expertise in a particular LEED rating system. The LEED AP BD+C credential suits professionals with expertise in the design and construction phases of green buildings serving the commercial, residential, education and healthcare sectors.

LEED GA – This in an entry-level certification that is required to achieve the LEED AP once you have more experience in green building. The LEED Green Associate credential demonstrates a solid and current foundation in green building principles and practices. From marketers to lawyers, landscape architects to education professionals, and product manufacturers to policymakers, LEED Green Associates enjoy a broad understanding of sustainability that bolsters their careers.LogoMemberUSGBC_R

CAPS – The Certified Aging-in-Place Specialist (CAPS) designation program teaches the technical, business management, and customer service skills essential to competing in the fastest growing segment of the residential remodeling industry: home modifications for the aging-in-place. CAPS professionals have the answers to your questions. They have been taught the strategies and techniques for designing and building aesthetically enriching, barrier-free living environments. The CAPS program goes beyond design to address the codes and standards, common remodeling expenditures and projects, product ideas, and resources needed to provide comprehensive and practical aging-in-place solutions. CAPS graduates pledge to uphold a code of ethics and are required to maintain their designation by attending continuing education programs and participating in community service.

CGP – The Certified Green Professional designation recognizes builders, remodelers and other industry professionals who incorporate green building principles into homes— without driving up the cost of construction. Classwork leading to the designation provides a solid background in green building methods, as well as the tools to reach consumers, from the organization leading the charge to provide market-driven green building solutions to the home building industry.

What other designations do you think adds value to your architect? Let me know – I am always looking for a new challenge. Next up for me is the CCCA.

For more thoughts on saving money, protecting the environment, and on architectural design visit my websites:

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2 Comments Add yours

  1. Loren says:

    Covered all the CSI certifications except CCPR? I am not one, but appreciate those that are!

    Like

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