17. Delta Shelter by Olson Kundig Architects #105architecturalinspiration


This is one of the most stunning houses I have come across. The pure use of natural materials set on a simple structural system allowing it to float in the woods makes this one of my favorite architectural creations. Designed by Olson Kundig Architects in 2005, the Delta Shelter is located in Mazama, WA. 

deltashelter
http://www.olsonkundigarchitects.com/Projects/38/Delta-Shelter#

Olson Kundig Architects describe it on their website as a 1,000 sf weekend cabin – basically a steel box on stilts. I have to say if this was my weekend cabin, it would be very hard for me to head back into town. The structure has huge windows to connect the inside to the outside, but also steel shutters to close it up when nobody is home (or I would guess when those at home need some privacy). The interior has clean lines and warm materials. The exterior materials are rustic and pure.

delta shelter 2
http://www.olsonkundigarchitects.com/Projects/38/Delta-Shelter#

#105architecturalinspirations is a collection of architectural details, buildings, and spaces that inspire me. I am taking on the challenge of finding two projects to spotlight each week in 2015. Hopefully I will be able to keep up and this process of discovery will push me to create better design solutions for my clients as I research and learn more about those projects I enjoy most. I challenge you to add your comments below about this project and to post your own inspirations for all to enjoy. 

Full List of previous #105architecturalinspiration posts

1. Jefferson’s Academical Village

2. Charleston, South Carolina

3. Solar Decathlon

4. National Museum of the American Indian

5. Lighthouses

6. Hatch Show Prints

7. The Aqua Tower in Chicago

8. Chicago Theatre Marquee

9. Samuel Mockbee

10. Richard Meier

11. Notre Dame du Haut

12. Philip Merrill Environmental Center

13. Church of the Light

14. Magney House

15. Monticello

16. William McDonough

7 Comments Add yours

  1. W. Blake Talbott says:

    Aesthetically wonderful, but its steel structure and fenestrations is equal to a 1700’s home, zero.

    Like

  2. No way it is energy-efficient and probably not very comfortable in cold or hot weather. Aesthetically it is beautiful.

    Like

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